How To Stay In the Moment

Have you ever felt like your life is spinning too fast or out of control? Do you have difficulties relaxing, because your mind is filled with “what if-” and “if only”-thoughts? Or do you simply have problems being present in the moment with your family and friends?  If so, you could definitely benefit from practising mindfulness.

Put very simply, mindfulness is the art of staying in the moment – the art of accepting what it is.  Mindfulness was originally developed by Jon KabatZinn in order for him to assist and help individuals with a wide range of medical issues. The practise is based on Buddhist philosophy and involves meditation, yoga and stretching techniques as well as some principles of cognitive behavioural therapy.

So what is mindfulness? Well, contrary to popular belief mindfulness is not just about learning how to relax. It is a way of being, about learning to be in the moment – in the Now – with help of observation. By practising mindfulness you become aware of what you are experiencing with acceptance, not trying to change things as they are at any given moment – the way they are right now – for better or for worse. It might sound strange or difficult to practise, and at times it is. I’ve learned from experience that this applies especially for very ambitious individuals whom been thought that you need to do whatever it takes in order to get what you want. The ones who feel the need to have control over their lives and by trying to do so, sadly live their life days, months or even years ahead of the present moment while the years pass.

Mindfulness is not about letting go of your own responsibilities for your own life or to just let things be as they are. It is more about doing your best at every given moment and feel satisfied with and accept that. Mindfulness gives everyone the ability to live life to the full and everyone can have it. The only thing you need to do is to investigate your mind and harmonise your senses.

“Do not pursue the past.
Do not lose yourself in the future.
The past no longer is.
The future has not yet come.
Looking deeply at life as it is.
In the very here and now, the practitioner dwells in stability and freedom.
We must be diligent today.
To wait until tomorrow is too late.
Death comes unexpectedly.
How can we bargain with it?
The sage calls a person who knows how to dwell in mindfulness night and day,
‘one who knows the better way to live alone.”
Bhaddekaratta Sutta

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s